Fifteen months after the COVID-19 pandemic began, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has promulgated an Emergency Temporary Standard (ETS) for healthcare employers. OSHA has published voluntary guidance for other industries.

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President-Elect Joseph Biden has not named a nominee for Secretary of Labor yet, much less an Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health who would lead the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). But individuals with a background in organized labor may be forerunners. He has promised to be “the most pro-union president

On July 15, 2020, Virginia became the first state in the nation to promulgate an Emergency Temporary Standard to address COVID-19 in workplaces. Even with vaccine deliveries on the way, Virginia has proposed a Permanent Standard for consideration by the Virginia Safety and Health Codes Board (which includes author Courtney Malveaux).

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Employers wondering whether Virginia is the new California just got their answer: California has some catching up to do.

In a split vote, the Virginia Safety and Health Codes Board (which includes author Courtney Malveaux) passed a first-in-the-nation standard to address COVID-19 in workplaces. Virginia Occupational Safety and Health (VOSH), the state’s version of the

In a press release issued September 11, 2014, OSHA announced the final rule for Occupational Injury and Illness Recording and Reporting Requirements.  For Federal Plan States, the regulation will come into effect on January 1, 2015; State Plan States will announce their dates independently but are encouraged to meet the same deadline.  This regulation brings

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (“OSHA”) Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to “Improve Tracking of Workplace Injuries and Illnesses” was published in the Federal Register on November 8, 2013.  The proposed rule amends the recordkeeping regulations to add three new requirements for the electronic submission of injury and illness information to OSHA.  In addition, OSHA will publicly post the electronically-submitted injury and illness information on its website and may create a searchable online database.  Employers and the public will have until February 6, 2014, to submit written comments on the proposed rule.   

The proposed rule does not expand coverage of the recordkeeping requirements or change the information that an employer is currently required to collect and maintain under 29 C.F.R. Part 1904.  Only those employers, who are already required to keep injury and illness records, will be subject to the new electronic-submission requirements discussed below.  Thus, employers with 10 or fewer employees or establishments in certain low-hazard industries, such as finance, insurance, retail, or real estate, are not subject to the new electronic requirements unless OSHA informs them in writing to keep such records and electronically submit them.   
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Silica (quartz) is one of the most common minerals on earth and contained in or critical to the production or manufacturing of an endless array of products and industries, like electronics, concrete, glass, brick, foundries, oil and gas, transportation and construction.  The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has proposed a rule that would cut

Under the Federal Aviation Administration (“FAA”) Modernization and Reform Act of 2012, Congress gave the FAA six months to issue a policy statement outlining those instances where OSHA could exercise jurisdiction over the safety and health of flight attendants. PL 112-95, Feb. 14, 2012, 126 STAT. 135.

On August 27, 2013, the FAA issued a